Moth Gallery

Family CRAMBIDAE

The following notes and images from this family of moths have been provided by Peter Hendry and Graham MacDonald.

Definitions:

Chaetosemata: Elevated circular patches of bristle like scales typically positioned near the compound eye and behind the antenna
Ocelli: Simple eyes, detect light but do not form an image

Palpi: Maxillary-Paired, usually segmented appendages serving as accessory jaws and assist in sensing food: Labial-Paired, usually segmented sensory appendages found on the lower lip and helping to close the mouth

Scape: The base segment of the antenna
Tympanal organ: An auditory organ, usually capable of detecting ultrasonic signals

1. Sub Family ACENTROPHINAE

Acentropinae Stephens, 1836

When James Francis Stephens described the Acentropidae (Acentropinae) he highlighted the fact the tibiae was without spurs but probably the most fascinating feature of the Acentropinae is their association with aquatic plants. Some are truly aquatic with the adult moths being observed diving into water and laying eggs under rocks. The larva of many species have external filamentous gills. They tend to be long-legged and spindly in stance.

Anydraula glycerialis moth

2. Sub Family CRAMBINAE

(Crambinae Latreille, 1810 )

The French zoologist Pierre André Latreille’s description of the Crambites (Crambinae) was rather simple noting the fore-wing is longer rather than wide and forming a flattened triangle when aligned with the abdomen. The palpi are a prominent feature of the Crambinae and Ian Common in Moths of Australia described them thus “The maxillary palpi are prominent and triangularly scaled, and the labial palpi are long and porrect in both sexes”. Many of the larvae feed on species in the plant family Poaceae (Grasses).

Hednota bivittella moth

3. Sub Family CYBALOMIINAE

Cybalomiinae Marion, 1959
Ian Common in Moths of Australia describes the Cybalomiinae as having the chaetosemata, ocelli and proboscis absent with the labial palpi porrect and the maxillary palpi well developed. However the genus Styphlolepis he refers to Cybalomiinae is herein reffered to Midilinae based on The Global Information System on Pyraloidea. – www.pyraloidea.org
Trichophysetis fulvifusalis moth

Browse moth galleries by genus

4. Sub Family GLAPHYRIINAE

Glaphyriinae W. T. M. Forbes, 1923
Forbes describes, in part, the Glaphyriinae as follows, “Head smooth; ocelli well developed; antennae of male not modified, with a rather small smooth scape; tongue normal, scaled at base (absent in the western genus Chalcoela); labial palpi moderate or rather long, the segments almost equal in length, the first two broadly scaled, the third much more slender, often pointed, upturned in the eastern species, porrect in Chalcoela. Maxillary palpi typically as long as a segment of the labials, obliquely porrect and rough scaled; rarely rudimentary.”
Hellula hydralis moth

Browse moth galleries by genus

5. Sub Family HELIOTHELINAE

Heliothelinae Amsel, 1961
In the Checklist of the Lepidoptera of Australia Heliothelinae is listed as a synonym of Scopariinae. The Global Information System on Pyraloidea. – www.pyraloidea.org, includes Heliothelinae as a separate subfamily with the following Australian genera, Eclipsiodes, Heliothela, Perimeceta and Phanomorpha.
Heliothela ophideresana moth

Browse moth galleries by genus

6. Sub Family MUSOTIMINAE

Musotiminae Meyrick, 1884
Meyrick noted that the Musotimidae (Musotiminae) were distinguished from all neighbouring families by the peculiar origin of vein 7 of the hind wing. Ian Common in Moths of Australia notes that while the adults are similar to the Nymphulinae (Acentropinae) the terrestrial larvae have the normal complement of spiracles (air holes). The larvae feed on ferns.
Musotima ochropteralis moth

7. Sub Family ODONTIINAE

Odontiinae Guenée, 1854
Ian Common in Moths of Australia notes that the Odontiinae are separated from other subfamilies by the unlobed praecinctorium, a structure which is usually biloded found between bubbles on the hearing organ and by the form of the male genitalia. The Chetosemata are absent, ocelli usually present and the proboscis and maxillary palpi usually well developed.
Pseudonoorda metalloma moth

Browse moth galleries by genus

8. Sub Family PYRAUSTINAE

Pyraustinae Meyrick, 1890
In his description of the Pyraustidae (Pyraustinae) Meyrick states the following, “Ocelli distinct, or very rarely obsolete. Tongue well-developed, or rarely obsolete. Maxillary palpi well developed, or rarely rudimentary.” Ian Common in Moths of Australia notes that the chaetosemata are absent.
Achyra affinitalis moth

9. Sub Family SCHOENOBIINAE

Schoenobiinae Duponchel, 1846
Part of the French Entomologist Philogène Auguste Joseph Duponchel’s description of the Schénobides (Schoenobiinae) translates as, maxillary palpi well developed, proboscis none or rudimentary, apex of the forewing obtuse or rounded in males and more or less acute in females. Duponchel also notes the larvae live and metamorphose in the interior of reeds, bulrushes and other plants. Ian Common in Moths of Australia notes that the chaetosemata are present.
Tipanaea patulella moth

Browse moth galleries by genus

10. Sub Family SCOPARIINAE

Scopariinae Guenée, 1854
In his original description of the Scoparidae (Scopariinae) the French entomologist Achille Guenée described the larvae as having smooth skin, devoid of colour and living in galleries, lined with silk, found amongst moss and under bark. Ian Common in Moths of Australia notes, “The labial palpi are well developed and porrect and the maxillary palpi are prominent. Chaetosemata and ocelli are present.”
Eudonia aphrodes moth

11. Sub Family SPILOMELINAE

Spilomelinae Guenée, 1854
In his original description of the Spilomelinae (Spilomelinae) the French entomologist Achille Guenée noted that only the labial palpi were visible. Other characteristics of the Spilomelina include the absence of chaetosemata, a bilobed praecinctorium (see Odontiinae)
Agathodes ostentalis moth

Browse moth galleries by genus

Family SATURNIDAE

 These are are Australia’s largest moths.

Eudonia aphrodes moth
Moth photographed by Jenny Thynne 01
australian butterflies insects moths bees and other invertebrates information club button. 2
Moth photographed by Jenny Thynne 10
Moth photographed by Jenny Thynne 13